7 Tips To Make Your Car Last Longer

7 Tips To Make Your Car Last Longer

One of the best things you can do financially is to keep your paid off car as long as you can. Cars are some of the worst when it comes to depreciation. When you have a vehicle that is paid off and still continues to be reliable, along with you following the tips below, you could be able to travel many miles with an occasional repair here and there.

The big point I want you to leave with today is that it’s much smarter to keep a reliable vehicle that is paid off, than it is to take on car payments again and the interest payments that come along with them.

Here are 7 tips to help make your car last for a very long time:

Car Tip #1: Start with buying the right kind of car.

You want one that has a history of being on the road for many years. An easy way to determine how long a vehicle will last is to take a trip around the area where you live. Notice older vehicles that are still on the road. After a while, you will notice certain kinds of cars still running strong.

Car Tip #2: Follow your cars prescribed maintenance schedule.

Cars are like people. Just like you have to keep your body in top running condition, which includes occasionally have going to the doctor to get their advice about staying healthy, it helps to take your car to the doctor for tune ups and maintenance.

Car Tip #3: Warm-up time.

After starting your car do not rev the engine especially if it’s been sitting for more than 5 hours, since there will be very little oil bathing the engine. Instead, let your engine warm up for a minute or so before driving.

Car Tip #4: Check your tire pressure regularly.

Keeping your tires inflated properly will not only extend the life of the tire but also increase gas mileage. Driving with faulty tires can even cause damage to your car’s front end.

Car Tip #5: Keep it clean.

Regular washing and waxing will help the exterior last longer and keep it from rusting. Plus, when your car looks good you feel good. Remember, nobody really knows how many miles you have on your car but you.

Car Tip #6. Lighten your load when driving.

The more a car weighs the more stress on your engine, suspension, tires and brakes. It’s not a good idea to use your car for commercial purposes, or for hauling agricultural or construction equipment if you want it to last for a long time.

Car Tip #7: Take it easy when driving.

Driving fast requires you to stop fast which wears out your brakes faster. Hard driving puts more stress on your car than is necessary. Driving slower will save you money on gas and reduce your chances of getting expensive speeding tickets.

These are great ways to help you keep your car for a long time. As you are driving around, I bet you’ll see many cars still going strong, even though you know they are many years old. Do you think fixing your older car when it needs it instead of buying a new car with ongoing car payments is a popular option? Well check this out:

Have You Ever Wondered How Car Dealers Really Make Their Money?

The general perception is that they make a ton of money on the sale of new cars, even though buying a new car can be one of the most stressful things we do.

According to personal finance expert Clark Howard, here are the facts:

The average transaction price for a new car or truck is about $34,000. New car sales make up 57.5% of the their revenue but only accounts for 20% of the gross profit.

Used cars make up 23% of revenue but accounts for about 11% of the gross profit.

So how do car dealers make the most profit? Parts and service make up 14.8% of revenue, and a whopping 41% is profit.

As you can see, over 67% of a car dealership’s profit comes from parts and service, all from people like you who smartly try to make their older car last longer, instead of taking on car payments again for 36, 48 or even 60 months, and all the interest payments that come along with car payments.

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